A Day in Grid 94 AND We Survived Week Five

Wow! What a week. In Grid 94, they continued their excavation of a mixed domestic and industrial courtyard with sunken jars and plaster installations. 

In Grid 92, they worked on exposing more of the Middle Bronze Age and in Grid 23/24, the team began dismantling the latest phase of the street and the buildings fronting it. 

It's a short weekend for us, we are back at work on Sunday, and then it is on to our last week. There is still a great deal to do. We'll be excavating three or four more days before we start sweeping for photos. At the same time, we will start organizing the storage of artifacts, prepare for the final party, and get ready to say goodbye to new friends. 

We have one more week to make memories and uncover another chapter in the history of Tel Shimron. 

 

A Day in Grid 92

A Day in Grid 23/24

Just Another Monday

We are back at work articulating walls, tracing floors, and finding all types of objects. The next two weeks will be busy as we race to finish all of our work before the end of the season.

Building Relationships

 Archaeobotanists from Tel Shimron talk with staff from Tel Kabri

Archaeobotanists from Tel Shimron talk with staff from Tel Kabri

Earlier this season, we hosted archaeologists from Tel Kabri. They toured the site and had an opportunity to use our flotation machine to process some of their samples. While here, they extended an invitation for Tel Shimron archaeologists to visit their site. Today, some staff had an opportunity to make that visit and while at Tel Kabri, they received a tour of the site's Middle Bronze Age palace.

 A large room in the palace

A large room in the palace

 Discussing stratigraphy with Tel Kabri Co-Director Assaf Yasur-Landau

Discussing stratigraphy with Tel Kabri Co-Director Assaf Yasur-Landau

Tomorrow we are back at work. It's the last two weeks of excavation and the end is almost in sight. This is both good and bad because we know what we need to do before we leave AND we know what we need to do before we leave. During the next week, Grid 94 will continue to expose more of their Late Hellenistic/Early Roman phase.

 Excavation in Grid 94

Excavation in Grid 94

In Grid 92, they will continue their hunt for the Middle Bronze Age. 

 Volunteers and staff getting a tour of Grid 92

Volunteers and staff getting a tour of Grid 92

In Grid 23/24 excavation will continue on the Late Roman/Byzantine period street and the buildings that front it. As always, it promises to be another busy week. 

 Street in Grid 23/24

Street in Grid 23/24

Drone Photography

Grid 23 had its first drone photograph this week. It's a time consuming process which begins the day before the photograph when the grid is cleaned and the shade cloth is dropped.  Once it is down, the grid is swept a second time to make sure it is clean and there are no visible footprints.

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The next day, the race is on to beat the sun and the shadows it casts as it rises over the top of the tel. The drone photographer comes and lays out a series of anchor points, which are also surveyed in by GIS, that aid in the georectification of the photograph so we know exactly where we are. Next, the photographer walks around the grid taking photos every few steps. Later, those photos are stitched together to build an Agisoft Photo Scan which is used to build 3D models. 

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Once that is completed, the drone goes up and another series of photographs is taken.

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When the drone photographer is all done, the shade cloth goes up and everyone gets back to work. It may take a lot of time but the bird's eye view offers an invaluable perspective of the grid and all the architecture within it.

Tel Tours

Staff and volunteers alike often get possessive about their dirt. Strange but true. When you spend a great deal of time uncovering your particular corner of Tel Shimron's history, it's easy to understand. You want to know what, where, when, and even why (if possible). It is equally true, however, that we are always curious about everyone else's dirt too. Twice a season, at the midpoint and near the end, volunteers and staff go on a tel tour where they have a chance to see all the excavation areas and ask questions. We went on such a tour last week as you can see in the pictures above. It was clear, as we visited each area, that we've come a long way from Week 1 when we started at ground level. Every area now has exposed architecture and interesting things to see.

We can't wait to see what the next two and a half weeks has in store for us.